LiturgicalCredo is accepting submissions for the Winter 2016 Edition through Dec. 2, 2015. The edition will be released on Dec. 15, 2015.

See the How To Submit page and About page for more details.

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You really must read this:

In this nearly magical room, amid fire-crackle and clink of glass, you can hear them talking. Pipe smoke is in the air, and a certain boisterous chauvinism, and the wet-dog smell of recently rained-on tweed. You can hear the donnish mumbles of J. R. R. Tolkien as the slow coils of The Silmarillion glint and shift in his back-brain. Now he’s reading aloud from an interminable marmalade-stained manuscript, and his fellow academic Hugo Dyson, prone on the couch, is heckling him: “Oh God, not another fucking elf!” You can hear the challenging train-conductor baritone of C. S. Lewis, familiar to millions from his wartime radio broadcasts; hear the unstoppable spiel of the writer/hierophant Charles Williams, with his twitchy limbs and angel-monkey face; hear the silver stream of ideas and argumentation that is the philosopher Owen Barfield. They are intellectually bent upon one another, these men, but flesh-and-blood is the thing: conviviality is, for them, a kind of passion. The chairs are deep; the fire glows gold and extra fiery in the grate. Lewis’s brother, Warnie, rosy with booze and fellow feeling, serves the drinks. And the walls drop away, and the scene extends itself backwards and forward in time …

Philip and Carol Zaleski’s The Fellowship: The Literary Lives of the Inklings is a mental map, a religious journey, and the biography of a brotherhood. Plenty of distinguished Inklings came and went over the years, padding across the carpets with a Warnie-provided drink in hand, but the Zaleskis zoom in on (and out from) the primary axis of Tolkien, Lewis, Williams, and Barfield, the four among whom the invisible correspondences of thought and affection were strongest. Christians all, these men formed what the Zaleskis call “a perfect compass rose of faith”: Barfield the proto–New Ager, Tolkien the rather prim orthodox Catholic, Lewis the noisy and dogmatically ordinary layman and popular theologian, Williams the ritualistic Anglican with a taste for sorcery.

Continue reading: How Tolkien and Lewis Revived Modern Myth-Telling | Book and Movie Reviews |Axisoflogic.com

Ivan Jenson

August 15, 2015

Ivan Jenson contributed five poems to the Autumn 2015 edition.

Jenson is a fine artist, novelist and contemporary poet. His artwork was featured in Art in America, Art News, and Interview Magazine and has sold at auction at Christie’s. Ivan was commissioned by Absolut Vodka to make a painting titled “Absolut Jenson” for the brand’s national ad campaign. His Absolut paintings are in the collection of the Spiritmusuem, the museum of spirits in Stockholm, Sweden. Jenson’s painting of the “Marlboro Man” was collected by the Philip Morris corporation. Ivan was commissioned to paint the final portrait of the late Malcolm Forbes. Ivan has written two novels, Dead Artist and Seeing Soriah, both of which illustrate the creative and often dramatic lives of artists. Jenson’s poetry is widely published (with over 500 poems published in the US, UK and Europe) in a variety of literary media. A book of Ivan Jenson’s poetry was recently published by Hen House Press titled Media Child and Other Poems, which can be acquired on Amazon. Two new novels by Ivan Jenson entitled, Marketing Mia and Erotic Rights have been published hardcover and are available on Amazon.com. and at bookstores everywhere. Ivan Jenson’s website is www.IvanJenson.com.

Anne Babson

August 15, 2015

Anne Babson contributed four poems to the Autumn 2015 edition.

Babson’s first full-length collection The White Trash Pantheon (Vox Press, 2015) and her current chapbook, Poems Under Surveillance (Finishing Line Press, 2013) are currently available in independent bookstores and on Amazon. The opera for which she wrote the libretto, entitled Lotus Lives, was performed in the Northeast in 2012 and is currently being considered for broadcast by WGBH Boston. She has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize four times. She has been featured on Poetry Daily.

Her work has recently appeared in Iowa Review, Cider Press Review, Southampton Review, Bridges, Barrow Street, Connecticut Review, The Pikeville Review, Rio Grande Review, English Journal, New Song, The Penwood Review, Sow’s Ear, The Madison Review, Atlanta Review, Grasslands Review, WSQ, Global City Review, Comstock Review, California Quarterly, Wisconsin Review, The Red Rock Review, and many other publications.

In Europe, her work has appeared in Current Accounts, Iota, Poetry Salzburg, Nth Position and in Ireland, she was in an issue of Crannóg last year. In Asia, she was published in Quarterly Literary Review Singapore and Yuan Yang. She has been anthologized multiple times in both the US and the UK.

She has done residencies at Yaddo and Vermont Studio Center.

An article by the late Colin Wilson, published in Philosophy Now:

“What is the trick of transforming ordinary perception into creative vision?

“We can begin by noting that poets do it all the time, so do great painters like Van Gogh. Read Shelley’s ‘Ode to the West Wind’ and you can feel the ‘phenomenological vision’. Or look at a great painting by Van Gogh or Vlaminck or Soutine. When I was working in a tax office in Rugby in my teens, I remember my boss saying with disgust that he thought Van Gogh simply distorted everything he painted. He was missing the point: that Van Gogh was saying: “This is how I see things when I put on my creative spectacles.” Rupert Brooke said that on a spring morning he sometimes walked down a country road feeling almost sick with excitement.

“Brooke realised that he could bring on this feeling by looking at things in a certain way. And what was really happening when he did this was that he had somehow become aware that he could see more, become aware of more, by looking at things as if they possessed hidden depths of meaning. For it is true. He was becoming conscious of the intentional element in perception, that his ‘seeing’ was in itself a creative act….

“The mind can deliberately change the way it sees things. Brooke tells how he can wander about a village wild with exhilaration:

 

‘And it’s not only beauty and beautiful things. In a flicker of sunlight on a blank wall, or a reach of muddy pavement, or smoke from an engine at night, there’s a sudden significance and importance and inspiration that makes the breath stop with a gulp of certainty and happiness. It’s not that the wall or the smoke seem important for anything or suddenly reveal any general statement, or are suddenly seen to be good or beautiful in themselves – only that for you they’re perfect and unique. It’s like being in love with a person… I suppose my occupation is being in love with the universe.’

“We can grasp what Ricoeur meant by ‘the very seeing is discovered as a doing’.”

via Phenomenology as a Mystical Discipline | Issue 56 | Philosophy Now

Read the entire article by Colin Wilson at Phenomenology as a Mystical Discipline | Issue 56 | Philosophy Now.

LiturgicalCredo is going straight for the well-worn phoenix simile. We’re not even going to apologize.

We will publish a new edition this fall, and we’re accepting submissions from July 2 to July 31.

We think we have a really cool “About” page, so please read it.

Then, learn what and how to submit.

We will rise like the phoenix to publish again. You can send us that peculiar griffin from your imagination.

LiturgicalCredo

A griffin in the Vatican Museum, Vatican City, Italy

Have enough aesthetic and literary knowledge to know what you’re up to. You need not be up to a lot, you just need to know how to do what you’re up to. That way, knowledge and intention can meet, and you will produce a complete compositon. — Colin Foote Burch

image

Putting things together...

LiturgicalCredo.com has a new editorial mission: contemporary mythopoeia, parables, fables, and fairy tales of 300-500 words in the forms of flash fiction, poems, and brief nonfiction.

New myths, parables, fables, and fairy tales allow storytellers to work with archetypal characters as well as fantastical settings. As enduring genres, they give writers economical modes of re-imagining contemporary conflicts, relationships, habits, assumptions, and beliefs.

In these modes, perceptive storytellers force us to find new grips on reality by showing us situations more true to our lifelong inner experiences than our moment-to-moment workaday lives. The best handle on life, we realize, is not quite where we thought it was.

Please see our About and Submit pages for more information about our mission and guidelines.

 

Kelly Belmonte offers an interesting, sturdy list on 12most.com:

via 12 Most Fundamentally American Literary Works.

via 12 Most Fundamentally American Literary Works.

Don’t misunderstand me! These aren’t great haiku — they were unplanned and off-the-cuff. I wrote them on the board for a freshman composition class. I was tuning the students toward an awareness of syllables, word choices, and images.

My off-the-cuff chalkboard haiku from a recent class. #teaching #poetry

Synecdoche is a figure of speech or trope that uses a part to represent a whole, or a whole to represent a part.

For example, “Hey blondie, let’s listen to Old Blue Eyes.”

Blondie calls someone by a reference to his or her blonde hair, and Old Blue Eyes is a nickname for Frank Sinatra, who most certainly had blue eyes. So in both cases, a part of the person represents the whole person.

“The Redskins missed the field goal.”

“Redskins” refers to the Redskins’ kicker, the whole team for the part who last night couldn’t quite get the pigskin through the uprights.

“Get your ass over here.”

Incidentally, one’s ass cannot arrive without the person attached to it, so the part is summoned as a way to get the whole (not hole) to arrive.

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We’re excited to share work by Shannon Curtin, a poet from Portsmouth, Virginia. Read two new poems by Curtin: Cutand The Bather.


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